Menu - Upper Menu

Languages:
AlbanianBulgarianCatalanCroatianCzechDanishDutchEnglishEstonianFrenchFinnishGalicianGermanGreekHungarianItalianLatvianLithuanianMacedonianMaltesePolishPortugueseRomanianRussianSerbianSlovakSloveneSpanishSwedishTurkishUkrainian
Current Issue

Important dates

The new version of the website will be released in December 2014. The next issue of Science in School, issue 31, will be published in February 2015. 

Check our calendar for upcoming events in science education and outreach

Highlighted articles

image

Sarah Garner and Rachel Thomas consider why well-designed and properly analysed experiments are so important when testing how effective a medical treatment is.

Image caption

Isabel Plantier teaches biology and geology to 15-year-old students in Portugal. She has been teaching for 25 years and tells Sai Pathmanathan that time really does fly when you’re having fun.

image

Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

Halina Stanley describes how two Israeli scientists investigated plasma balls and in the process found a potentially useful way to create nanoparticles.

Image caption

Jonathan Swinton pushes back the frontiers of knowledge – in his kitchen.

image

Marlene Rau presents some fizzy and fun activities involving carbon dioxide, developed by Chemol and Science on the Shelves.

By Nina Notman

image

Male or female? What are the issues surrounding children for whom the answer is not clear? Researchers Eric Vilain and Melissa Hines hope to provide some of the answers.

It can be difficult and time consuming to develop materials for really good science lessons. Many scientific research organisations, however, provide teaching resources, often designed together with teachers. Researchers provide scientific expertise and the teachers bring years of experience in the classroom.

These materials include pictures and videos as well as ideas for scientific experiments in the classroom. Some institutes even develop computer games for an interactive learning process. Sabrina Graß from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory reviews some online materials to help you to

Deutsches Museum in Munich

Elisabeth Schepers from the Deutsches Museum in Munich, Germany, introduces a school programme linking climate change and the future of traffic technology.


Nataša Gros, Tim Harrison, Irena Štrumbelj Drusany and Alma Kapun Dolinar introduce a selection of experiments with a simple spectrometer designed especially for schools – and give details of how to perform one of the activities.

By Sonia Furtado Neves, EMBL

image

Brain tumours are one of the most common causes of death in children – and may begin when chromosomes are torn apart during cell division.

Werner and Gabriele Stetzenbach tell us how kindergarten and primary-school children discover the world of physics together with secondary-school students as their mentors. Why not try it in your school?

image

Lucy Patterson spoke to Nick Barker, a former secondary-school chemistry teacher and head of year who, after 12 years in the classroom, landed a dream job as a Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) Teacher Fellow.

In celebration of the International Year of Biodiversity 2010, Matt Kaplan takes us on a whirlwind tour through the previous year’s most inspiring discoveries of biodiversity.

Why not get your students to make their own predictions of climate change – with the help of Dudley Shallcross and Tim Harrison from Bristol University, UK?

Henri Boffin from ESOw1 in Garching, Germany, follows the mystery of gamma-ray bursts from their first discovery to the most recent research on these dramatic astronomical explosions.

Because of its low alcohol content, ginger ‘beer’ is a popular drink with British children. Dean Madden from the National Centre for Biotechnology Education, University of Reading, UK, gives his recipe for introducing younger students to the principles of fermentation, food hygiene and the biochemistry of respiration.

image

As a child, Maggie Aderin-Pocock dreamed of going into space. She hasn’t quite managed it yet, but she’s got pretty close, as she tells Eleanor Hayes.

In this, the second of two articles, climate researcher Rasmus Benestad from the Norwegian Meteorological Institute examines the evidence that humans are causing climate change.

By Claas Wegner, Stephanie Ohlberger

image

More than 10 years ago, a very clever and inventive inhabitant from a favela discovered he could produce light without electricity. Now solar bulbs are spreading all over the world.

Mercury drops

Sigrid Griet Eeckhout from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, investigates what determines the toxicity of mercury compounds – and how X-ray light is helping to solve the mystery.

School students visit a Masai Mara village

With the help of enthusiastic school students and scientists, the Dutch school competition ‘Imagine’ supports the sustainable production of biodiesel in Mozambique, avocado oil in Kenya and the colorant byxine in Surinam. Daan Schuurbiers and Marije Blomjous, from the Foundation Imagine Life

image

Scientific research is not a career that most people believe to be suitable for the blind, but such beliefs are changing. Biologist Geerat Vermeij explains that, whether you are blind or not, science is competitive, tedious and hard – and he loves it.

Faulkes Telescope Project

Ever wanted to take a closer look at the stars? Rachel Dodds from the Faulkes Telescope Project explains how you can do just that – together with your students and without even leaving your classroom!

By Dorotee Schulter

image
 

For doctor Stefan Pfister, efforts to cure cancer happen at the hospital and in the laboratory.

Image caption

We are relative newcomers on Earth and still have a lot to learn. Julian Vincent from the University of Bath, UK, investigates some of the lessons we can learn from the living world.


Particle physics is often seen as something only for huge research institutes, out of reach of the general public. Francisco Barradas-Solas and Paloma Alameda-Meléndez demonstrate how – with the aid of a homemade particle detector – you can dispel this myth by bringing particle physics

By Gianluca Farusi

image

What links your jeans, sea snails, woad plants and the Egyptian royal family? It’s the dye, indigo. Learn about its fascinating history and how you can extract it at school.

By Philippe Jeanjacquot and Jean Lilensten

image

The aurorae are one of the wonders of the natural world. Using some simple apparatus, they and related phenomena can easily be reproduced in the classroom.

Films about science or even pseudo-science can be powerful tools in the classroom. Jenna Stevens from the CISCI project provides a toolkit for using the film Erin Brockovich in chemistry and ecology lessons.

Photo of the day

Readers' feedback

Support the print journal

Learn more

Menu - My Account

Science in School e-newsletter