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Important dates

The new version of the website will be released in December 2014. The next issue of Science in School, issue 31, will be published in February 2015. 

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Highlighted articles

Films about science or even pseudo-science can be powerful tools in the classroom. Heinz Oberhummer and Markus Behacker from the Cinema and Science project provide a toolkit for using the film Deep Impact.

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How much do Europeans really know about science and technology? What do they think about it? Do they even care? Russ Hodge from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory reports on one of the Eurobarometer surveys.

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What do continental drift, nuclear power stations and supernovae have in common? Neutrinos, as Susana Cebrián explains.

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Eleanor Hayes introduces the winners of the Science in School writing competition.

Genes and diseases course

Mariolina Tenchini, Director of Cus-Mi-Bio in Milan, Italy, introduces a university initiative to motivate science teachers and provide both them and their students with hands-on experience of cutting-edge science.

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Paul Tafforeau from the University of Poitiers and the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France, explains what synchrotron X-ray studies of fossil teeth can tell us about the evolution of orang-utans – and our own origins.

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What do astronomy and film have in common? Both can involve Jochen Liske, astronomer and actor. Karin Ranero Celius takes us on a trip to the Paranal Observatory in Chile and tells us about Jochen’s latest film: Das Auge 3D.

Werner and Gabriele Stetzenbach tell us how kindergarten and primary-school children discover the world of physics together with secondary-school students as their mentors. Why not try it in your school?

Winfried Weissenhorn’s group at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Grenoble, France, has uncovered a possible way to tackle a range of dangerous viruses –by trapping them inside their cocoons. Claire Ainsworth investigates.

Stress cracks in nature: the natural growth pattern of a tree causes residual stresses in the wood of the trunk. When the trunk is felled and the wood begins to dry, these stresses can overcome the strenght of the wood and lead to significant cracks

Darren Hughes from the Institut Laue-Langevin in Grenoble, France takes a look at stress. How can it be manipulated to make safer

Beat Blattmann and Patrick Sticher from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, explain the science behind protein crystallography and provide a protocol for growing your own crystals from protein – an essential method used by scientists to determine protein structures.

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Science on Stage brings together many of Europe’s most innovative and inspiring science teachers. Andrew Brown reviews some of the recent national activities.

Crab nebula

Ever wondered what - and who - lies behind the beautiful and fascinating astronomical photographs and observations made with modern telescopes? Douglas Pierce-Price from ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, describes a day

The author, Isabella Marini, and her students at the Liceo Scientifico Ulisse Dini, Pisa

Why are enzymes so special? How do they differ from inorganic catalysts? Isabella Marini from the University of Pisa, Italy, describes a classroom protocol to enable students to answer these questions for themselves.

By Oren Harman

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Does true altruism exist? And can science provide the answer?

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Ever wanted to launch a rocket? Jan-Erik Rønningen, Frida Vestnes, Rohan Sheth and Maria Råken from the European Space Camp explain how.

By Estelle Mossou, ILL

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As young scientists from across Europe gathered in Bratislava to exhibit their projects, find out what impressed the jury most.

By Erin Tranfield

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Soaring temperatures, a flooded landscape, violent winds…. What would our planet be like without the Moon?

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Helke Hillebrand has always been fascinated by science, but on the back of a career in plant biology, her urge to work more closely with people helped her decide to go into tending young minds instead of new shoots. Vienna Leigh reports.

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations. This article reviews some of the latest news from the EIROforum members (EIROs).

Bernardo Patti is the Columbus mission manager at the European Space Agency. He is an engineer and worked at nuclear power plants before going into space technology. Shortly before Columbus was launched, he talked to Anna-Lynn Wegener.


Originally, Nadia Salem wanted to become a research biologist and find a cure for cancer. Today, she is a reporter for Nano, a daily science magazine on German-language TV. Nadia talked to Marlene Rau about the unpredictability of life and the joys of being a science journalist.

Sonia Furtado and Marlene Rau report on the news from the national Science on Stage representatives.

Anne MJG Piret from the European Commission assisted the jury during the recent EU Contest for Young Scientists.

Investigating gears

In the second of two articles on developing the processes of enquiry, hypothesis and testing, Alfredo Tifi, Natale Natale and Antonietta Lombardi describe how to build and apply some of the low-cost equipment they have developed.

Do you enjoy the drama of science? The colour, the smells, the intricacies? Why not follow science teacher Bernhard Sturm’s suggestions: let your students bring yet more drama into the classroom by (re-)enacting science, to help them visualise and remember the lesson.

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What types of plastic are used to build a car? How are they synthesised and recycled? Marlene Rau and Peter Nentwig introduce two activities from the ‘Chemie im Kontext’ project.

We all know that yeast is used to produce beer and bread – but electricity? Dean Madden from the National Centre for Biotechnology Education, University of Reading, UK, shows how it works.

Susan Greenfield

Susan Greenfield and Martin Westwell from the Institute for the Future of the Mind consider the needs of the future scientist.

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