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Important dates

The new version of the website will be released in December 2014. The next issue of Science in School, issue 31, will be published in February 2015. 

Check our calendar for upcoming events in science education and outreach

Highlighted articles

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What does it take to live on the Moon or even Mars? Erin Tranfield suggests an interdisciplinary teaching activity to get your students thinking about this – and learning a lot of science along the way.

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Catch a Star!, an international competition for school students, is starting its fifth year. Douglas Pierce-Price from ESO invites students from all over the world to take part.

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Karen Smith from NEF, the New Economics Foundation, London, UK, describes an approach to creating a safe space where students can discuss sensitive topics, like stem-cell research or genetically modified food. How can students be encouraged to explore their values in relation to science topics, and to debate the ethics

Nucleogenesis in stars

Henri Boffin and Douglas Pierce-Price from ESO, in Garching, Germany, investigate our celestial ancestry.

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations. This article reviews some of the latest news from the EIROforum members (EIROs).

Chromatin

We tend to think of our genetic information as being encoded in DNA – in our genes. Brona McVittie from Epigenome NoE, UK, describes why this is only part of the story.

By Marissa Rosenberg from EU Universe Awareness

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During an eclipse, the Sun or the Moon seems to disappear. What is happening? Why not explore this fascinating phenomenon in the classroom, with an easy to build model?

Ellen Raphael from the charity Sense About Science explains why peer review is so important in science, and describes how an existing guide is being adapted to meet the needs of science teachers.

Plug

Do you ever get frustrated with that mess of cables connecting your DVD player to your satellite dish, TV and video recorder? Did you know that you can cut those cables – and still get a signal to pass between the machines? Alessandro Iscra, Maria Teresa Quaglini and Giuseppina Rossi from Italy describe an experiment that

By Cristina Florean

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You are what you eat – quite literally. Our diet can influence the tiny changes in our genome that underlie several diseases, including cancer and obesity.

By Eleanor Hayes and Marlene Rau

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We all know what a kilogram is – or do we? Researchers worldwide are working to define precisely what this familiar unit is.

Do you or your students enjoy painting and drawing as well as teaching or learning science? Would you like to see your artwork reproduced 30,000 times and distributed across Europe? The Science in School cover competition gives you and your students the opportunity to do just that.

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations. This article reviews some of the latest news from the EIROforum members (EIROs).

By Oren Harman

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Does true altruism exist? And can science provide the answer?

Children acquire technical skills by building the exhibit ‘The Magic Soap Curtain’

Amito Haarhuis from the Science Center NEMO in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, describes a project that challenges pupils aged 11-12 to design and create their own exhibits.

By Jérôme Ganne and Vincent de Andrade

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Studying the chemical composition of some of the planet’s oldest rocks has revolutionised our understanding of how our continents formed.

Tuberculosis isn’t something Europeans normally worry about. But the disease is re-emerging and is resistant to many of our drugs. Claire Ainsworth describes how Matthias Wilmanns and his team are trying to hold the disease back.

Investigating the properties of slime

Tim Harrison and Dudley Shallcross from the University of Bristol, UK, describe some of the University’s activities to share a delight in chemistry with school students.

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Ivo Grigorov from the EurOCEANS project describes how the deep seas can help us to understand and predict climate change.

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Eleanor Hayes highlights some education resources about the nanoscale and nanotechnology.

Climate change is nothing new. Caitlin Sedwick describes how a computer model is helping scientists to explain the extinction of the woolly mammoth.


Fed up with explaining genomes, genes and proteins? Why not get your students to figure it out for themselves using Johan Leveau’s DNA puzzle?

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Helke Hillebrand has always been fascinated by science, but on the back of a career in plant biology, her urge to work more closely with people helped her decide to go into tending young minds instead of new shoots. Vienna Leigh reports.

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Gabriel Cuello from the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, introduces a new type of digital memory that may revolutionise our USB sticks.

We’ve all heard that an antioxidant-rich diet is healthy. Together with his students, Gianluca Farusi compared the antioxidant levels in a range of foods and drinks.

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

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Fay Christodoulou, a Greek PhD student at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), is an example that shows not every researcher is born with a passion for science. She describes to Anna-Lynn Wegener from EMBL how her biology teacher inspired a long-lasting interest in science.

 

An enormous meteorite impact and then a rocky flight from Mars. Is that how life appeared on Earth? Cornelia Meyer takes us on a space trip through the lithopanspermia theory and describes how she is putting it to the test with the help of student colleagues.

The author, Isabella Marini, and her students at the Liceo Scientifico Ulisse Dini, Pisa

Why are enzymes so special? How do they differ from inorganic catalysts? Isabella Marini from the University of Pisa, Italy, describes a classroom protocol to enable students to answer these questions for themselves.

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

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