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» Issue 9

Issue 9

Can You Feel the Force? Putting the Fizz Back into Physics

By Richard Hammond

Reviewed by Jennie Hargreaves, Lockerbie Academy, UK

Is there anybody out there? An ark of life

An enormous meteorite impact and then a rocky flight from Mars. Is that how life appeared on Earth? Cornelia Meyer takes us on a space trip through the lithopanspermia theory and describes how she is putting it to the test with the help of student colleagues.

Welcome to the ninth issue of Science in School

Image caption

“Before I start, I’d like to mention two things: half of what I’m telling you will be wrong; and I don’t even know which half.” This introduction by renowned molecular biologist Ueli Schibler to his students illustrates a discomforting aspect of science. The only way to find out which half is wrong and which is right, is by disproving existing ‘truths’ and replacing them with new ones.

Detecting sugar: an everyday problem when facing diabetes

Fred Engelbrecht and Thomas Wendt from the ExploHeidelberg Teaching Lab describe some experiments on sugar detection to demonstrate the problems that people with diabetes face every day.

Cornelius Gross: from the classroom to the laboratory

The majority of young scientists working in research have only ever been that – scientists. But Vienna Leigh reports how one group leader at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory started his career at the front of a classroom – and feels that his science benefits as a result.

Climate change modelling in the classroom

Why not get your students to make their own predictions of climate change – with the help of Dudley Shallcross and Tim Harrison from Bristol University, UK?

Materials science to the rescue: easily removable chewing gum

Halina Stanley investigates the history of chewing gum, how the chemistry of the gum affects its properties, and how scientists are using this knowledge to make chewing gum less of a pollutant.

Interview with Steve Jones: the threat of creationism

Steve Jones talks to Vienna Leigh about the startling re-emergence of creationism in Europe, how teachers can help, and why he will never argue with a creationist.

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