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English, Biology

How water travels up trees

By Clare van der Willigen

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Why do giant redwoods grow so tall and then stop? It all has to do with how high water can travel up their branches.

Become a water quality analyst

By Sarah Al-Benna

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Industrial activities and even geological changes can affect the quality of water, causing contamination that poses risks to human health and the environment. Learn how to become an independent analyst to ensure that we have good-quality water.

Using biological databases to teach evolution and biochemistry

By Germán Tenorio

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Online tools can be used to compare the sequences of proteins and understand how different organisms have evolved.

Solving a sticky problem for cancer treatment and getting into the fusion energy game

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

From construction to destruction: building lasers and melting walls

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

Food that shapes you: how diet can change your epigenome

By Cristina Florean

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You are what you eat – quite literally. Our diet can influence the tiny changes in our genome that underlie several diseases, including cancer and obesity.

Making the right moves

By Sarah Mclusky

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Cell’s movements are important in health and diseases, but their speed is the crucial point for the 2013 World Cell Race organised by Daniel Irimia.

Doctor in the morning, researcher in the afternoon

By Dorotee Schulter

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For doctor Stefan Pfister, efforts to cure cancer happen at the hospital and in the laboratory.

From model organism to medical advances

By Louise Weston

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A simple fungus used to brew beer is now used around the world to advance cancer research.

Tales from a plague pit

By Kirsten Bos

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Archeology and genetics combine to reveal what caused the Black Death.

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