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» English, Earth science

English, Earth science

Glaciers on Mars: looking for the ice

By Miguel A. de Pablo and Juan D. Centeno

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One of the scientists’ main interests in Mars research is water. Is there water on Mars?

A range of scales: from fusing a nucleus to studying a dwarf planet

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

The secret life of volcanoes: using muon radiography

By Paolo Strolin

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How do we find out what’s going on inside a volcano? Using cosmic rays!

Casting light on solar wind: simulating aurorae at school

By Philippe Jeanjacquot and Jean Lilensten

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The aurorae are one of the wonders of the natural world. Using some simple apparatus, they and related phenomena can easily be reproduced in the classroom.

Cracking the mystery of how our planet formed

By Jérôme Ganne and Vincent de Andrade

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Studying the chemical composition of some of the planet’s oldest rocks has revolutionised our understanding of how our continents formed.

Propping up the wall: how to rescue a leaning tower

By Susan Watt

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Civil engineer John Burland talks about the perils and practicalities of supporting some of the world’s most iconic buildings.

Movers and shakers: physics in the oceans

By Susan Watt

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Contrary to the popular saying, deep waters are often far from still – which is just as well for marine life. Activities using simple water tanks are a good way to find out about the physics at work beneath the waves.

Cool and hot science for a bright future

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations. This article reviews some of the latest news from the EIROforum members (EIROs).

Building a seismograph from scrap

By Panteleimon Bazanos

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Did you know that you can use old hi-fi speakers to detect earthquakes? And also carry out some simple earthquake experiments in the classroom? Here’s how.

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