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English, Physics

From construction to destruction: building lasers and melting walls

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

Glaciers on Mars: looking for the ice

By Miguel A. de Pablo and Juan D. Centeno

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One of the scientists’ main interests in Mars research is water. Is there water on Mars?

The way of the dragon: chemistry for the youngest

By Anna Gunnarsson

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In Sweden there lives a small, green dragon called Berta, who invites young children to join her adventures in Dragon Land – all of which are about chemistry.

Classroom fundamentals: measuring the Planck constant

By Maria Rute de Amorim e Sá Ferreira André and Paulo Sérgio de Brito André

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Bring discovery into the classroom and show students how to evaluate Planck’s constant using simple equipment.

A range of scales: from fusing a nucleus to studying a dwarf planet

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Science in School is published by EIROforum, a collaboration between eight of Europe’s largest inter-governmental scientific research organisations (EIROs). This article reviews some of the latest news from EIROs.

Purple fumes: the importance of iodine

By Frithjof C Küpper, Martin C Feiters, Berit Olofsson, Tatsuo Kaiho, Shozo Yanagida, Michael B Zimmermann, Lucy J Carpenter, George W Luther III, Zunli Lu, Mats Jonsson & Lars Kloo

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Iodine, with its characteristic purple vapours, has myriad applications – from the familiar disinfectant to innovative solar cells.

The secret life of volcanoes: using muon radiography

By Paolo Strolin

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How do we find out what’s going on inside a volcano? Using cosmic rays!

Life without the Moon: a scientific speculation

By Erin Tranfield

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Soaring temperatures, a flooded landscape, violent winds…. What would our planet be like without the Moon?

A thermometer that goes to 200 million degrees

By Phil Dooley, EFDA-JET

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Measuring the temperature inside a fusion reactor is no easy task. Find out how it’s done – and even simulate it in the classroom.

Casting light on solar wind: simulating aurorae at school

By Philippe Jeanjacquot and Jean Lilensten

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The aurorae are one of the wonders of the natural world. Using some simple apparatus, they and related phenomena can easily be reproduced in the classroom.

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