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Making physics flourish in Poland: Maria Dobkowska

By Katy Hewis

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Physics teacher Maria Dobkowska describes the challenges of remaining creative within a strictly defined national curriculum and of working with children with disabilities.

The new definition of crystals – or how to win a Nobel Prize

By Mairi Haddow

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Why is symmetry so central to the understanding of crystals? And why did ‘forbidden’ symmetry change the definition of crystals themselves?

Behind the autism spectrum

By Andreas Chiocchetti

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Research into the genetics of the autism spectrum is increasing our understanding of these conditions, and may lead to better ways to diagnose and manage them.

Seeing is believing: 3D illusions

By Andrew Brown

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To make the two-dimensional images that we see in print and on screen appear more real, we can hijack our brains to create the illusion of a third dimension, depth. These activities explore the physics that make this possible.

Welcome to the twenty-fourth issue of Science in School

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As I write this, the children in my village have been back at school for two weeks. The school just down the road, however, doesn’t start again for another two weeks. If school holidays – and indeed school types, curricula and teacher training – differ so much within Germany, how much variation must there be across Europe?

Welcome to the twenty-third issue of Science in School

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What makes diamonds strong or a tiger stripy? Why is music uplifting or the Alhambra palace beautiful? The answer: mathematics. As mathematician Marcus du Sautoy explains in our feature article, mathematics is all around us – and this can be the key to exciting lessons.

The Wonder of Genetics: The Creepy, the Curious, and the Commonplace

By Richard V. Kowles

Reviewed by Michalis Hadjimarcou, Cyprus

Build your own radio telescope

By Bogusław Malański and Szymon Malański

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Astronomers use giant radio telescopes to observe black holes and distant galaxies. Why not build your own small-scale radio telescope and observe objects closer to home?

Science on Stage: a Slovak-British relationship

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For two science teachers from opposite ends of Europe – David Featonby and Zuzana Ješková – Science on Stage was the beginning of an inspiring and enjoyable collaboration.

Solar energy: silicon solar cells

By Enrique García-García, Yahya Moubarak Meziani, Jesús Enrique Velázquez-Pérez and Jaime Calvo-Gallego

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With oil reserves running out, silicon solar cells offer an alternative source of energy. How do they work and how can we exploit their full potential?

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